Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm Image
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81

Generally favorable reviews - based on 35 Critics What's this?

User Score
6.8

Mixed or average reviews- based on 55 Ratings

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  • Summary: In Gathering Storm, the second expansion to Civilization VI, the world around you is more alive than ever before. Chart a path to victory for your people by developing new advanced technologies and engineering projects and negotiating with the global community in the World Congress onIn Gathering Storm, the second expansion to Civilization VI, the world around you is more alive than ever before. Chart a path to victory for your people by developing new advanced technologies and engineering projects and negotiating with the global community in the World Congress on critical issues. The choices you make in the game will influence the world ecosystem and could impact the future of the entire planet. Natural disasters like floods, storms, and volcanoes can pillage or destroy your Improvements and Districts – but they may also refresh and enrich the lands after they pass. In addition to these new systems, Civilization VI: Gathering Storm introduces eight new civilizations and nine new leaders. Seven new world wonders can be constructed, as well as a variety of new units, districts, buildings, and improvements. Expand
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 28 out of 35
  2. Negative: 0 out of 35
  1. Feb 11, 2019
    100
    Put simply, Gathering Storm checks all the boxes of what a great expansion should be and is a must own for hardcore Civilization VI fans looking for a reason to spice things up in an incredibly positive way or get back into the game if they’ve been dormant.
  2. Feb 11, 2019
    90
    The astute Civ player can shape the history of their nation and craft a story for the ages with with pinpoint accuracy. The Gathering Storm enriches this experience by giving you more ways to add subtle realism to how the world evolves around you and how you can directly affect it. With so many new and returning features, it’s hard not to recommend this expansion to Civ fans, turning an already great game into one for the literal ages.
  3. Feb 14, 2019
    90
    Climate change is not a new thing for Civ, but it has been missing in a few games. It may sound strange, but it is very nice to have it back in Gathering Storm as it adds a lot of depth.
  4. Feb 11, 2019
    80
    Gathering Storm is a very good expansion that highly enriches the endgame by adding the global warming issue, and asking the player to deal with it.
  5. 80
    Bringing a new level of complexity and strategy with it, Gathering Storm forces you to participate in diplomacy in later eras and offers new ways to succeed with certain play styles.
  6. Feb 20, 2019
    75
    Gathering Storm comes with some minor drawbacks, but I can easily recommend it to fans of Civilization VI. Bear in mind, though, that the new additions and tweaks in the mechanics may require some getting used to. Furthermore, the roster of civilizations hasn't been better in a very long time.
  7. Mar 1, 2019
    60
    Gathering Storm offers a mixed bag. The ambition is clear, with climate change and the World Congress being major changes that sadly fails to fully live up to their potential. At the same time, the new resource mechanics are engaging, and the new leaders and other additions make for an expansion filled with content. Nevertheless, Gathering Storm does not live up to the standards set by last year's expansion, Rise and Fall.

See all 41 Critic Reviews

Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 5 out of 12
  2. Negative: 3 out of 12
  1. Feb 18, 2019
    10
    Overall: This is the game it was meant to be. The world feels real, diplomacy matters much more, resources are now handled more logically, andOverall: This is the game it was meant to be. The world feels real, diplomacy matters much more, resources are now handled more logically, and the new civilizations bring variety to how the game is played. I actually find myself saying "... just one more turn ...", which was rare before this expansion in Civ VI.
    Civilizations: I honestly didn't know what to expect of the civ selections prior to the leak, because the last several announcements for Rise and Fall were truly underwhelming. This was not the case, for me, with Gathering Storm. The new ensemble brings several needed favorites, and they sre balanced by new and replacement civs that haven't left me disappointed (except maybe Canada, but then I may immigrate there some day, so I'll keep an open mind). More importantly, unlike most of the DLC and Rise & Fall civs, the civs of Gathering Storm feel like they bring unique approaches to how I play the game (even Canada, completely changing early game diplomacy without Surprise Wars). When I play as Mali, I'm working to maximize trade, building walls (because I have enough units and all my buildings and districts have been bought- thanks Reyna and Moksha), and generally feeling like an unparalleled economic powerhouse. As Phoenicia, my empire is built around my "colonies", as my new distant capital citizens refer to them, and I've got harbors out the wazoo. And so it goes.
    Map: Not only has there been a massive and appreciable aesthetic upgrade (my fiancee that doesn't even play commented on this), but the map generation is more interesting and better developed. Additionally, I play with climate settings maxed out, so I regularly get flooded and volcanoed (I've lost many citizens already, once a catastrophe that wiped a 10 pop mega-city of it's time down to a 3 pop rural outpost (remember, in civ games population has an exponential relationship to number of fictional people). Tornados have surprisingly damage my troops, dust storm have wreaked having, droughts have limited me when I really need to grow, and so on. While many of these were setbacks, I put myself in place for them by settling near where the later yields would see me flourish- so I only have myself to blame. And I can't say it was pretty or an interesting event for my people.
    Resources:

    Why oh why wasn't always like this? Of my two least favorite changes from V to VI, I'm so incredibly happy to see this one fixed. Resources matter, and it always should have been this way. I'm now engaged with the system, and consider how I'm using and acquiring them. (Now, if you would just readjust movement costs to align with V, we'd be all set)!
    Power: I play carefree enough that I can often make it to the late game, and I enjoy the add costs of environmental and resource challenges to developing my empire. It reminds me that a lot of the progress in the world post-Industrial era was centered in the few nation's that were able to terribly abuse resources for energy. The game now reflects this, and it's a fun and engaging system. Hopefully the real world continues to progressively move on from resource abusing means of energy production too.
    Diplomacy: The grievances system as a coat of fresh paint on an old vehicle, but that new paint job came with some work under the hood which has led to the vehicle running more smoothly. Beyond that, the added late game agendas have added an appreciated additional dynamic to the AI leader charachter, which is appreciated (even if I would just rather have the personality table from V back). Additionally, we have the featured new diplomacy system, with favor and the World Congress. For this, I say thank you. It feels right having a political system in the game, and I appreciate that it's notably different than what we had in the past. It's no longer simple to merely buy votes alone and dominate politically, now you must earn favor with positive relationships with major civs and earning the suzerainty of the minor powers (of course, the better your relations, the easier it is to actually do some of that bribing, in this case for favor rather than direct votes). While I don't always enjoy the lack of variety (getting three identical proposals in a row, IIRC), I enjoy that there are fairly powerful resolutions, contests, a revamped and improved emergency system, and an additional approach to diplomacy. Overall, I'm quite a fan!
    New Era: I appreciate the opportunity to stretch out the game, especially from a science and military game perspective (the two victory paths that have the most potential to benefit from the new aspects). The GDR is interesting, and the added time led to the developers really upgrading the science victory. With a slightly longer game, you also get more opportunity to appreciate later game buildings and events (like climate change).
    Is it perfect? No, but it's the best game for my tastes on the market, and this heavily loaded expansion pack is the reason.
    Expand
  2. Feb 18, 2019
    9
    A solid addition across all most all levels of the game. GS has found a way of balancing complexity and accessibility is ways that ParadoxA solid addition across all most all levels of the game. GS has found a way of balancing complexity and accessibility is ways that Paradox game are still struggling with. The new civs offer nin-synchronous ways of approaching the new mechanics; only complaint is that the old civs could use more of a rework in terms of the new system. Expand
  3. Feb 16, 2019
    9
    A thoroughly enjoyable experience, and a wonderful expansion to Civilzation 6. It makes the game feel fresh, and the new mechanics are largelyA thoroughly enjoyable experience, and a wonderful expansion to Civilzation 6. It makes the game feel fresh, and the new mechanics are largely successful. There are a few problems with the newest content only playing into late-game, and not having them influence your decision-making enough; but the quality is very high, the new leaders are really cool, and the new diplomacy and disaster systems are wonderful. The climate change system is really neat, but it is so out of your control that it's difficult to plan around. Expand
  4. Feb 17, 2019
    6
    I always buy everything Civilization and so I did this time. It's not bad, but unfortunately, new features do not alter the gameplay in anyI always buy everything Civilization and so I did this time. It's not bad, but unfortunately, new features do not alter the gameplay in any significant way, Either environmental effects or world congress are things you can simply not bother with and still be perfectly fine. There are some good UI changes, new leaders, new units, etc, so I'd say it is a very nice DLC but a lackluster expansion. Still, I never regretted a single dime spent on Civilization and I still don't. The only thing is, the Civilization V expansions were so much better. Expand
  5. Feb 16, 2019
    6
    Game is decent, but needs a lot of balancing and bug fixes until I can recommend it at this price.
    40 eur? Nope.
    Diplomacy is broken: AI
    Game is decent, but needs a lot of balancing and bug fixes until I can recommend it at this price.
    40 eur? Nope.

    Diplomacy is broken:
    AI is making silly choices and demands left and right, if you play with more than 6 civilization you will go crazy with the amount of stupidity AI offers you each turn (not to mention trade offer spam which mostly is ridiculous)

    World congress:
    Very disappointed. It's unrealistic and deals mostly with resources.
    Imagine all the world leaders coming together and deciding what to do with extra spices or camels.
    Basically, you will see this:
    A: Resource X brings +1 amenities.
    B: Resource X brings no amenities.

    Needs a lot of improvement

    And finally, environment effects: YOU DONT FEEL THEM.
    The most advertised feature is really underpowered and you hardly notice it.
    Just click away notifications and build the right improvements.

    Anyhow, until these things are fixed, I can't recommend getting the game at 40 eur, wait for a discount.
    Expand
  6. Feb 17, 2019
    5
    Mediocre early access for an unfinished DLC that is being packaged and sold as an expansion. The new AI needs work, the new systems needMediocre early access for an unfinished DLC that is being packaged and sold as an expansion. The new AI needs work, the new systems need proper integration in a meaningful way, and a balancing pass (or three) would not hurt. It is 20% off after only a few days, but I would be patient and wait for a 50%+ off sale.

    The news on 2K that hit in mid-Feb (2019) is correct, if a little late. They are, and have been data mining you since early 2018. The worrying fact is that unlike good companies, they do not promise the information is for their own, internal use, and will not be sold to third parties. If you avoid Twitter or Facebook for their policies, then 2K is on your blacklist. At least until they update it with the appropriate promise of privacy for us in their Privacy Policy (where they hid these clauses instead of integrating them in their EULA where it would be highly visible).
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  7. Mar 14, 2019
    0
    Still no Ukraine, 1/10. They are adding African nations but still didnt add famous European nation.

See all 12 User Reviews