DIY Magazine's Scores

  • Music
For 2,102 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 DAMN.
Lowest review score: 20 Songs for Our Mothers
Score distribution:
2102 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Emotional Education is a thoughtful, carefully-constructed synthpop odyssey, based at its core around the vocal harmonisation by Lily Somerville and Megan Marwick and lent some tasteful gloss by production work from The xx collaborator Rodaidh McDonald as well as duo MyRiot.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The musical accompaniment to the installation works perfectly as a concept album, where heady instrumentals and psychedelic pop nuggets are intertwined with swelling strings and a nursery rhyme story narrated by The Clash’s Mick Jones.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A People’s History of Gauche captures both the rotten societal traits and inspiring persistence that is often associated with people on the ground.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    While their new guise has them in a more experimental mood - injecting doses of nostalgia all over the shop - it also doesn’t quite possess the same level of clout as before.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s rough around the edges, but that’s part of its charm - a testament to the energy and ideas thrown about in such a short space of time, and the vibrancy of collaboration.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Until The Tide Creeps In is a record totally out of step with any modern music scene, and all the more timeless and special for it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    III
    [The off-trend songs like Alaska, Sawzall and Hawaiian Mazes] feel freer, more exciting and more innovative. But III isn’t that. Instead, for the most part, it feels like Banks-by-numbers.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Stonechild is an exercise in top-level songwriting, stately and intelligent.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Endlessly creative and euphoric, the MacGyvers of music have created a record that’s not only politically charged, but brimming with the joys of life and creativity.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result sees Plague Vendor’s ferocious punk swirl around explosions of synth and thunderous electronic drums, a combination that ultimately propels their ever-present homage to classic sounds into the present day.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A record that barely takes its foot off the gas pedal. This onslaught would make even the most hardcore listener flinch. Bring earplugs.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Small Mercies is not a complete success, but Pixx’s creative voice remains unique.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you’re partial to a bit of blue-collar punk, this is likely to be right up your street.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Two Door Cinema Club have learnt how to harness their mainstream power while taking creative risks. They pay off almost every time.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The beauty of The Raconteurs is in the timeless joy of hearing two world-class songwriters, cut from two very different sides of a similar cloth, come together to make something if not greater, then at least as good as the sum of their considerable parts. And in that sense, Help Us Stranger succeeds, and then some.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A record that pushes each of its contributors to stamp their own mark, uniting them under the banner of heartbreak but leaving room for each vocalist to twist the blueprint to their own shape.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their more collaborative process has brought an album that, while rarely deviating from that Hot Chip sound, feels lighter and freer. Like a band finally feeling confident in their own skin, inviting us to find escape from whatever troubles us in their music.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    She writes and wears her heart on her sleeve, half-singing, half-sighing through her songs with wide-eyed candour, shining through such swoon-worthy dream- pop. At some point, you’ll wonder if it was Hatchie’s heartache and pain that was written about, or your own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Far from the fools of their name, Dumb are onto something pretty magnetic.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tackling interesting ideas and putting rock through an avant garde filter, Mattiel Brown’s powerful vocals once again impress too on what ultimately feels like a significant step forward.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A record which thrives on evoking feeling and catharsis, while remaining committed to their personal influences, on Doom Days they’ve managed to deftly build a conceptual world not all too different to the one we’re facing right now, and that feels like a triumph in itself.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On The Book of Traps and Lessons Kate Tempest continues to impress as one of the UK’s most vital voices.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With jubilant tie-dye riffs and squiggly guitar lines around every corner, And Now For The Whatchamacallit is every bit the celebratory psych-rock album it strives to be.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Much like their previous releases, Run Around the Sun is a collection of delightful, sunshine-soaked fuzz-pop.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A thread of hope and resilience runs through, via bright, surfy punk and power pop.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It feels darker an offering than some of their earlier work, more textured and full of otherworldly sound effects that often only become obvious on multiple listens.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It has a tendency to be superfluous--a stray tabla rhythm is never too far away--but ultimately it’s a fun record that’s clearly born of love and dedication. That’s something to be commended.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Dots is an outright success. It combines forward-thinking sound design with complex songwriting, and an astute taste for pop hooks with rich, intelligent lyrical content. It’s a joy to experience.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The result is an album that’s pleasant but kind of passes you by, and for a singer that was always so charismatic, being just ordinary feels like a bit of a bummer.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This opening statement from a band emerging as one of Britain’s most inspired and uncompromising, could just be a strong starting step in a vivid and unconventional journey.