Edge Magazine's Scores

  • Games
For 3,087 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 16% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 81% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Grand Theft Auto V
Lowest review score: 10 FlatOut 3: Chaos & Destruction
Score distribution:
3087 game reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Bonkers, yes. But Muse Dash soon becomes baffling in less endearing ways. [Issue#335, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's an involving, and sinister story to pursue on that front, but as with the City the Kid yearns for, 198X never gets there. [Issue#335, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Take it slow, keep an eye on those health bars, and you'll find a fighting game that offers a thrill that few others can - with nary a 20-hit combo in sight. [Issue#335, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's definitely a kind of magic to discover here, but Sea of Solitude too often breaks its own spell. [Issue#335, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Oakmont is a convincing Lovecraftian town - but the point of those stories is that these are places you'd never want to find yourself. [Issue#335, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This charming, eccentric mash-up is well worth a spin. [Issue#335, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a testament to the strength of Pedro's core premise that you'll likely persevere through design fumbles, odd pacing and wonky writing in search of more bonkers ultraviolent combos and leaderboard glory [Issue#335, p.108]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Hamstrung slightly by its hardware, this is a wonderful and educational creative tool; better, if less lovable, than its predecessor. A compromise, then, but a damn-near essential one. [Issue#335, p.104]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    A sandbox where waypoint distances are measured in pixels, and journeys are over in seconds, is surely one worth celebrating. [Issue#334, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For all the gags, Astrologaster is a romp with no little substance. [Issue#334, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the big budget, SIE London Studio has approached Blood & Truth with a modest ambition: to make you feel special, and strong, and more than a little silly, in a love letter to the city it calls home. It has done so with a flourish. [Issue#334, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rare is the game that comes along, one that believes in its hero - in you - so earnestly, and shows us the real value of being brave. [Issue#334, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A slightly muddled gimmick and dilute sense of identity mean Sonic is unlikely to outpace the competition. [Issue#334, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The joy of Void Bastards, once it reveals itself, is that no action, no decision, is standalone. [Issue#334, p.112]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The relentless thrill of one half of it dragged down by the barren, boring needless sprawl of the other. [Issue#334, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kubrick would surely approve. [Issue#334, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is still a little deflating. While some detective work is engaging, too much of it is throwaway, repetitive and, worse, overused. Tailing missions are the worst offender, simplistic, overlong, tightly scripted and seemingly everywhere. In its cutscenes, its combat and its tales of the lives of struggling, troubled, randy everyday people - in all the tings that make it a Yakua game, in other words - Judgment excels. In the things that seek to make it stand apart, it disappoints. Whether this is a one-off experiment, or simply the first of many, remains to be seen; if it's to be the latter, much remains to be done. [Issue#335, p.102]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sensibly expanded and gently refined, this is textbook sequel-making. [Issue#333, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The killing is enjoyable, but we'd have happily done much more of it. [Issue#333, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Modest and ingenious and smartly priced, Islanders is as engaging to tinker with as a palate cleanser between bigger games as to take seriously in pursuit of a high score - wonky mansions and all. [Issue#333, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a delightful time. [Issue#333, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    With better class implementation, carrying through into PvP, it might have been able to assert its own identity. [Issue#333, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Finally, here's an RPG that, in every sense, leaves you wanting more. [Issue#333, p.114]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Like the grisly cutscenes, Mortal Kombat 11 is fun as long as you don't think too hard or look too closely at it - but that's exactly where the real joy is found in a fighting game. If Mortal Kombat wants to elevate itself, it's time to start overhauling the skeleton underneath all that flesh. [Issue#333, p.110]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    What a shame. Days Gone is ripe with potential, but it's always in those moments before something actually happens: when you hear the rumbling of thunder heralding an impending downpour, or a distant engine letting you know tourble's on the way. But when it all kicks off, the spell is broken. This is "State of Decay" without the stakes, "The Last of Us" without Naughty Dog's storytelling chops, and the most generic, overlong open-world game around. [Issue#333, p.106]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Yet this game lingers somehow when you're not playing. [Issue#332, p.123]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the most distinctive, exciting and fully realised puzzle games we've played in years. [Issue#332, p.122]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It lacks the infectiousness of 80 Days, but as a story and a reckoning with history, it leaves most videogame fantasies in the shade. [Issue#332, p.120]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Dangerous Driving simply isn't suited to a mode that won't let you crash. Patched out, or left optional, these wouldn't be enough to stop most from happily reliving Burnout's heyday; currently, however, it would be reckless to recommend. [Issue#332, p.118]
    • Edge Magazine
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Heaven knows we've played thousands of forgettable videogame stories over the years, so perhaps the best tribute we can pay to the departed developer is this: EDGE will remember it. [Issue#332, p.116]
    • Edge Magazine

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