Nintendo Life's Scores

  • Games
For 3,647 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 21% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 9.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Super Mario Maker 2
Lowest review score: 10 Santa Factory
Score distribution:
3650 game reviews
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Automachef is absolutely not for everyone; it’s a puzzle game that overwhelms you from the start and only piles on more complexity as you progress through its 45 stages. There’s a degree of satisfaction to be found in spending hours putting together large, elaborate automated set-ups, troubleshooting their flaws then finally seeing them work as intended, but you need to put in a hell of a lot of work for that payoff and for many the toll it takes on the old noggin won’t be worth it.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Dead in Vinland: True Viking Edition takes the solid survival RPG and people management of the original 2018 game and combines it with the two main DLC packs that have dropped since then. While some of the same old issues are still there on Switch – specifically the forgettable combat and random nature of its systems – there’s still a lot to like about this Viking adventure. Balancing so many spinning plates is stressful, but seeing your community come back from the brink of despair only to flourish is an experience few other games on the platform can match. There’s very little here to attract players who have already braved Dead In Vinland’s wilds, but even without support for touchscreen play, the titular isle still has plenty to offer new settlers.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    As long as you’re playing it docked and willing to put the time in to master its helium-light handling, Rise eventually reveals itself to be a rewarding and visually fantastic arcade style racer with an interesting Challenges mode. Its slightly blurry handheld visuals and the complete lack of multiplayer are disappointing, but persevere with its slippery steering and the payoff is a fun – if unforgiving – solo racing game.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    It doesn’t take very long for Lust for Darkness to overplay its hand and reveal just what kind of horror game it really is; for all the shock value of seeing some Giger-esque creature with an overtly phallic head or yet another doorway shaped like genitalia, you realise it’s just that: hollow grotesquery employed for the sake of making you cringe. There are a handful of moments of genuine unease, but they’re few and far between in what is ultimately a short trudge through sex-inspired horror landscape that wastes the opportunity to find some genuinely interesting allegory in all that face-value titillation. Still, at around three hours to complete, at least it’s a mercilessly brief experience.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tiny Metal: Full Metal Rumble surpasses both its predecessor and the recent Wargroove to become the number one Advance Wars clone available on Switch right now. Indeed, it may be fair to say that this time around Area 35 has beaten Advance Wars at its own game with a super-tight and generous SRPG that takes the best from the greats it emulates and wraps them up in a much more modern and satisfying package. Battles here are challenging, tense and highly replayable affairs, new tactical options add even more depth to proceedings and the story, once it gets going, will keep you locked in until the fight is done. Long-suffering Advance Wars fans take note, this one really is pretty much essential.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Marvel Ultimate Alliance 3: The Black Order isn’t a groundbreaking, narrative-heavy reinterpretation of the comic characters you know and love, but then again neither were the first two games. In that regard, it’s a very faithful sequel that mines the vast roster of characters from the comics while including plenty of nods to the current state of the more modern Marvel Cinematic Universe. While it doesn’t do anything particularly new or outstanding, it embraces the brainless fun of its brawler combat with gusto, and it’s at its absolute best when played with a team of player-controlled supers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Etherborn looks fantastic, sounds incredible and revolves around a brilliant game mechanic that initially feels like it’s going to lead to some clever puzzles but ramps things up far too quickly and engulfs you with frustratingly complex stages while you’re still trying to find your feet. There’s still a great game in there, but you’ll need to have the patience of a saint to stumble up its 90-degree difficulty curve to find it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While God Eater 3 has taken a bit of a knock in the visuals department, it’s a sacrifice that’s more than worth it for mostly consistent performance and a steady framerate. The inclusion of local co-op is a real boon for Nintendo Switch owners, especially as there’s no telling how the game’s online community will fare in the months to come. With all the current content updates and patches included at launch, you’re arguably getting a version as good as - if not arguably better than - those on PC and PS4. If you’re longing for an alternative to Monster Hunter and you can’t wait for Dauntless, this is your next port of call.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The introduction of ranged weaponry really opens up your titan-battling options, and Territory Recovery is a welcome new Dynasty Warriors-style mode that embraces the game’s best mechanics. However, the pricing model is far too high and only serves to penalise players who already own the base game.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Streets of Rogue isn’t the cheapest of rogue-lites available on the eShop, but years of developmental evolution in Early Access have resulted in the final product making it to Nintendo Switch, and while we do feel the asking price is a tad high, the amount of content you get far surpasses what you’re probably expecting. RPGs are at their best when they give you a world where you can be anyone and do anything - Skyrim has built its legacy on that very concept - so if you want to be a werewolf, or a scientist, or a bartender, then this is the game for you.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Should you buy Terraria on the Switch? Well, that’s a rather nuanced question. On one hand, you have a stable version of an enjoyable, content-rich sandbox classic that can be played both at home and on the go, with that latter option proving to be an intuitive take. On the other hand, the current lack of local co-op is pretty damning for many, especially given that this Switch version is selling for a notably higher price compared to other modern versions. We’d ultimately give this one a recommendation, as the dozens of hours of content and simple, open-ended nature of Terraria’s gameplay prove to make a strong case for why this one deserves a spot on your Switch’s home screen, but if co-op is an important factor for you, we’d suggest you either wait this one out or just pick it up for another platform.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On its own, Paradox Soul is an average Metroidvania that will keep you reasonably entertained throughout its fairly short duration thanks to its creepy art direction and atmospheric soundtrack. But when you look at it next to some of the more accomplished examples of the genre on Switch, its repetitive nature and uninspired cover-shooting mechanics hold it back from being truly recommendable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Dr. Mario World is very much a game of two halves. The single-player mode is fun in short bursts and short bursts only: lengthier sessions are impossible without regularly dropping real cash on it. Meanwhile, the multiplayer is an unrestricted delight, and the steady stream of available players means it could become your next obsession. Most importantly, both modes are built around a legitimately entertaining touchscreen twist on the standard Dr. Mario gameplay that makes plenty of changes, but clever ones that take the mobile format into account. It isn’t proper Dr. Mario, then, but – assuming you can keep your wallet in your pocket – what it is isn’t half bad.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It takes a surprising amount of effort to beat Minecraft at its own game, but we’d argue that Dragon Quest Builders 2 in many ways surpasses its inspiration in fun factor and replayability. The melding of JRPG conventions with the open-ended and creatively focused sentiments of sandbox gameplay proves to go over much smoother than you’d expect, especially now that Square Enix seems to know what it’s doing with this sub-series. Dragon Quest Builders 2 is a much more confident game than its predecessor, boldly expanding on its concepts, fixing many of its flaws, and providing an overall more robust adventure experience that fans won’t want to miss out on. Charming characters, a well-tuned gameplay loop, and near endless replayability ensure that you’ll be coming back to this one for quite some time, and though the performance issues are disappointing, we’d still highly recommend you pick up Dragon Quest Builde rs 2.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    War Tech Fighters does exhibit a few rough spots here and there, but it is undeniable that it ticks all the right boxes for any self-respecting mecha fan. As of right now, it's a toss-up between this and Project Nimbus Complete Edition for the title of top mecha game on Switch, but if you're after a fast and exciting robot-based space shooter and don't mind long loading times and the odd awkward menu system, then this is worth a look.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For those longing for a time when side-scrolling shooters ruled the roost, Blazing Chrome is exactly what you're looking for. Perfect for short sessions, its slick gameplay and old-school art direction make for an astonishingly fun game full of explosions, epic set pieces and spectacular boss battles. Its brutal difficulty may not be for everyone, but if you're up for the challenge, then get ready for one of the most accomplished 2D action titles in years.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Another Sight does possess some attractive qualities. There’s an interesting story and a strong enough central character to hold it all together. Meeting some famous faces from the Victorian era of technological advancement is a nice touch, but these moments are few and far between. Most of the time you’ll be wrestling with a needlessly clunky set of platforming mechanics and some repetitive level designs and not overly creative puzzles. The visual impairment gimmick does work to an extent, but you get the impression this would have worked much better as a local co-op experience rather than as a solo adventure.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    We spent a long time mulling over why Senran Kagura: Peach Ball didn’t push any of our buttons. If you find anime ladies with animal features highly appealing, you can probably add a couple of points to the score below. Ultimately, though, Peach Ball serves up a tedious, repetitive story with monotonous characters and pinball tables that can be characterised likewise. Despite a polished art style and a genuinely interesting idea of livening up the arcade game in a way only possible in a video game, we found the end result sorely lacking in the pinball department.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    SolSeraph is a tale of two games; it manages to successfully add some depth to the strategy elements of its inspiration, creating a fun little top-down side to things whilst falling way short of that game in its platforming sections. Even if you're a diehard Actraiser fan and you've been chomping at the bit for this day to come and even if you're willing to put up with the shoddy action sections, there's the matter of the extremely blurry, odd-looking graphics and unstable framerate to contend with. It genuinely feels like an unfinished game in places, and it’s a real shame. If Ace Team had managed to put together any sort of decent side-scrolling action here it would have been on to a winner but, as it stands, this only goes to highlight what a miracle, what a classic for the ages Actraiser really is, whilst confirming itself as, unfortunately, one to avoid.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Stranger Things 3: The Game isn’t going to set any gold standards for video game tie-ins, but it does a fine job of capturing all the elements that have made the TV show such a phenomenon. Exploring Hawkins and interacting with the wider cast is really going to appeal to fans of the franchise, but the repetitive quest designs and unremarkable combat can make it a bit of a slog if you’ve yet to catch the Stranger Things bug. Still, thanks to its appealing visuals, accessible gameplay and atmospheric synthwave soundtrack, there are arguably many worse ways to spend your summer.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What Remains of Edith Finch is a 'Walking Simulator' that doesn’t just tell an unforgettable story – it's genuinely unforgettable. As tragic as its tale is, it always manages to entertain. As one section ends and as you fight back tears, you’ll always carry on, because the next story is as engrossing as the last. If you want a strong feature-length story that doesn’t waste a minute, Edith Finch is the one you need.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    We’re aware that screenshots of Lucah: Born of a Dream really don’t do the game justice. That aesthetic is going to put off some potential new players, but look past the purposefully jagged looks and there’s something far more palatable beneath. With its slick and deep combat system and the unashamedly bleak nature of its allegorical story, Lucah uses its visuals to help bolster its unique identity and stand apart amid considerable RPG company on Nintendo Switch. Sure, it can be a little frustrating to navigate in places, but it’s a small price to pay for the elements that shine bright elsewhere in the darkness.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Heartwarming; that’s the word to describe Dream Daddy. It’s a feelgood game, from its tongue-in-cheek Dream Weaver-esque theme tune to its message of acceptance and generally being excellent to one another. The entire game lives on its writing, which is universally excellent and works on multiple levels whether you’re a parent or the child of one. On the surface it’s a hot dad dating game – the swirly logo font and colourful presentation lean into that – but there’s real heart to the stories here, with textured characters dealing with a multitude of situations life throws at them. If you’re after rock-hard anime abs and mechanics that promise 'innovative' use of HD rumble, you may be disappointed with Dream Daddy. For everyone else, it’s a good-natured, good-humoured visual novel with themes of acceptance and love that’ll warm the cockles of the coldest heart.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Psyvariar Delta truly is a comprehensive package that combines all the features from both Medium Unit and Revision, giving the player the chance to customize the experience in a way that has never been possible in prior releases. Add in the graphical upgrade, Tate support (which is perfect for the Flip Grip, by the way), an exclusive level, a new optional character to use and smooth performance either docked or portable, and this becomes a must-have for any Switch-owning shooter fan; however, casual players or those who simply aren't fans of the genre may find the focus on high scores and short length off-putting. Still, it's a fine shooter, and we can but hope the Sega Naomi-powered Psyvariar 2: The Will to Fabricate will eventually receive a similar deluxe treatment in the future.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s no doubt that Graveyard Keeper is a fun game every now and again; there are bright nuggets of gold sporadically hidden within it. It’s the video game equivalent of Now, That’s What I Call Music: you get it for a few good hits and deal with the fluff in-between. However, if you’re looking for a strong competitor to Stardew Valley or Rune Factory, this doesn’t quite hit the mark.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Q-YO Blaster is a great little tribute to Parodius, filled with inventive enemies and brilliantly designed boss battles. Its gameplay is solid and addictive with a beautiful art-style reminiscent in places of the mighty Cuphead. It’s short and sweet for sure, but it’s got lots of replayability and is perfect for whipping out for a quick blast on quick journeys and, all in all, is yet another cracking addition to the Switch’s ever-growing roster of top quality shmups.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s nice to see another relatively uncommon Sega game getting the Sega Ages treatment, but while it’s still perfectly playable after more than three decades, the arcade version of Monster Land suffers from frustrating combat and a general lack of spark. Its importance in the evolution of the action platformer can’t be denied, but it’s not quite as addictive as other Sega Ages games, and while the emulation is as flawless as ever, the underwhelming extra modes mean there’s less incentive to keep coming back time and time again. Still, sometimes it's nice to play a game that has a bit of history behind it, and this is one such game; it may not be anywhere near as refined as Wonder Boy's more critically-acclaimed adventures, but it's still an entertaining way to spend an hour or two.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Having shaken off the free-to-play nature of its origins – Yamada had a set amount of stamina on mobile, meaning he could only code his game for a certain amount of time each day – Dandy Dungeon embraces all of the brilliant little quirks that make it a great game in its own right. The light-hearted take on one man’s inability to separate reality from fantasy really works as a great conceit for the overall game, while the puzzle-like approach to combat and exploration makes the now rather tired world of roguelites feel instantly more refreshing. Don’t let this little gem pass you by.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s crazy to think that the original Red Faction Guerrilla came out 10 years ago, especially when you consider no one has matched it for sheer destructive agency. As an open-world third-person shooter, Red Faction Guerrilla: Re-Mars-tered doesn’t do much to set itself apart from the pack, but its unscripted destruction physics help elevate even the most boring of missions into a riot as you smash walls to reach an objective or use a rocket launcher to crumble enemy vehicles. With extra DLC bundled in and some decent Switch exclusive motion controls, Red Faction Guerrilla is another forgotten shooter that deserves a second (or third) shot at stardom.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite the fact that this is unquestionably a very fine video game, there's no escaping the fact that the Switch version has some serious issues; assets are noticeably weaker than they are in other versions, the frame rate is halved and the loading times are maddeningly protracted at points. Fingers are crossed that the developers can remedy some of these problems with proposed updates, but for the time being, this is arguably the least impressive edition of the game – although the fact that it's portable perhaps counts for more than you'd think.

Top Trailers