The Independent (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 1,712 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Psychodrama
Lowest review score: 20 Exile
Score distribution:
1712 music reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Lost Tapes II sounds like an artist rediscovering his love for hip hop in the most joyous and satisfying way.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A thrashing, crashing metal record with brief dalliances in solemn balladry (as on the stark, compelling “Never There”) and even Imagine Dragons-style stadium pop (jarring album closer “Catching Fire”), it is a noisier, more impersonal record, and one that aspires to a thematic breakthrough that it never quite reaches.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    12 meticulously crafted songs. ... Just as the preceding art installation invited viewers to enter its vast head of LED lights and wonder, this album does the same.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Though his fare is bland, it is sincere and hygienically prepared. No thrills, but all affable, affordable, family-friendly fills.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    III
    III is Banks’s most cohesive album to date because she’s no longer restricting herself to exploring one feeling at a time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    As a listener you want the artist to sound comfortable in their own skin. But by the end of Case Study 01, it’s hard to be convinced that this is really him.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A slow-burning triumph.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He drifts like a spectre through a labyrinth, exploring his favourite themes of sleep, reality and the subconscious. The tones here are stark and bleak, compared to the claustrophobia of 2014’s Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes. ... By the end of ANIMA, you’re left wondering about those dreams that are just out of reach, but also what we risk losing when we look back.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A viscerally entertaining album that never lingers for more than four minutes per song. Rock’n’roll isn’t dead: it’s just been sleeping.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On False Alarm, though, they offer something that proves they’re still worth paying attention to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    For all its glimmering synths and the robotic pathos of Taylor’s idiosyncratic vocals, this is a record with both heart and soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is music that sounds as fun to make as it is to listen to. The energy here is thrilling, the strong rhythm section provided by former Detroit garage band The Greenhornes’ bassist Jack Lawrence and drummer Patrick Keeler. ... Help Us Stranger has been a long time coming, but it was worth the wait.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The emotional cohesion the record loses in its shifting cast of singers/songwriters/genres it makes up in DJ-savvy textural variety.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    On this album, you find yourself drifting in and out. She tackles trolls, racism, overpopulation and the internet age. You crave solutions as each track closes, or perhaps more of those sublime, witty character studies she offered on Let Them Eat Chaos.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Where most rock superstars sink into trad tedium by 69, Springsteen is still crafting sophisticated paeans of depth and illumination, a rock grandmaster worthy of the accolade. A must-have for anyone who has a heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is an intriguing, often brilliant, though occasionally awful record.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an album that shows a band who’ve grown stronger and unafraid to flex their muscle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    There’s a focus on tribal percussion and a multitude of vocal techniques you don’t expect on a pop album: folky vocables, angular melodies, overdubbing, a male choir. This is more enthralling on some tracks than others.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album loses some momentum around the more generic “Strangers”. But even with that song, the harmonies are hard to resist. It’s the best pop comeback – and likely one of the best pop albums – of the year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Kind Heaven is an ambitious, engaging record by an artist who clearly still has plenty of fire in his belly.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It’s their most poppy and psychedelic-leaning work to date, bursting with colour and fuelled by a multicultural band featuring Elenna Canlas on keys and backing vocals, and Ish Montgomery on bass.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result is a quintessentially London record, as dark and moody as it is brash and innovative.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The arrangements are suitably bombastic: there’s a theremin camping up the pub piano on his cover of Laura Nyro’s ”Wedding Bell Blues”. His version of Bruce Wayne Campbell’s (aka Jobriath) 1973 glam stomp “Morning Starship” really sells the wry/cosmic lyrics about a girl picking a rocket’s lock with her hairpin. ... Morrissey’s take on Joni Mitchell’s “Don’t Interrupt the Sorrow” is leaden jazz karaoke, stripping the original of all its haze and drift. The electro-stomp/harp, fading to reflective piano fade-out of his reworking of Melanie Safka’s ”Some Say I Got Devil”, makes a joke of his lifelong self-pity.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Flamagra--a playful yet melancholic, skittish yet meditative 67 minutes of cosmic genius--is one of Flying Lotus’s most accessible releases.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The production here is superb. Tyler has never been one for traditional song structure, but on IGOR he’s like the Minotaur luring you through a maze that twists and turns around seemingly impossible corners, drawing you into the thrilling unknown. ... This is Tyler’s best work to date.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album of polished pop. Perhaps this will put her at the top where she belongs.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I Am Easy to Find feels like an old friend you’re pleased to keep around--even if, had you been introduced today, you wonder if you’d have been compelled to make the effort.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Always exquisitely unbothered, the indie-rock poster boy now sounds like he can’t be bothered.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    We have to wait for the final, title track for the end of suffering. That Carter’s young daughter Mercy is on the recording ramps up the emotion and hopeful vibe of this acoustic ballad. It’s a much-needed resolution to an album of full-throttle catharsis.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This deathly intrigue is drawn from Lenker’s own personal traumas, which she successfully spins into something that feels universal. But you don’t come away from this record feeling downcast. It’s more a reminder of how fleeting yet beautiful life is, and an appeal to make the most of it.