The Line of Best Fit's Scores

  • Music
For 2,647 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 27% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 76
Highest review score: 100 Illmatic XX [20th Anniversary Edition]
Lowest review score: 30 Supermodel
Score distribution:
2647 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While the sombre tone of these 15 tracks may result in some listeners skipping through in search of something energetic, what lies at the end of this record for those with patience is a truly beautiful collection of stories built through pensive soliloquy as a means of exploring abrasive subjects.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Curve of Earth is sparse, but the trio make up for it with their relatable and confessional take on what their idea of a vast Americana is and how to simply survive within it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Charming, addictive and seemingly effortless, Cuz I Love You is Lizzo’s declaration of superstardom.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 45 Critic Score
    The underlying intensity to their music on previous records is stripped away, leaving in its wake a bland and largely forgettable experience.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Serfs Up! is almost certainly their most accessible, most coherent collection to date.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There’s few missteps--a middle section which ventures off discordantly into murkier electronica never quite seems to fit a listen-through. But Wilkinson has once again proved his complete mastery of bottling a certain tone to his music through the right craft of sounds. With Ribbons, he has bottled springtime.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    It’s the songs themselves that should guarantee the album’s global success. Throughout the mini-album are references to BTS’ past and reflections on their growth as artists and individuals.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With sumptuous harmonies and a live band locked in on every track, .Paak finds a sweet spot between throwback soul and the 21st Century dancefloor. He sounds like the best version of himself. ... An exceptional return to form.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    A record of considerable dimensions, always well controlled though never in the least predictable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Although the switch to stark monochrome from the blazing multicolour of the Maraqopa trilogy can seem underwhelming and slight at first, further listens reveal In the Shape of a Storm--boosted by Jurado’s hypnotically committed, intimate performances--to hold together surprisingly well considering the disparate origins of the material.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Dogrel is evocative, meticulous and rich in a love for the character of Dublin, and all the little things that, past and present, contribute to that.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The impulsive outpouring of Noise & Romance is reminiscent of Deerhunter and their side projects back in their prolific Microcastle / Weird Era Cont. days; flooded with good ideas and inclined to put them all to use.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Agora is hypnotic, transient and valuable and a rarity which although oppressive at times ultimately delivers on a promise as tangible as it is striking.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    There’s much on this sleek and self-confident debut to suggest that the young band are wholly capable of sculpting their own unique voice amongst all the others.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What A Boost is Rozi’s best, most interesting and experimental album to date. It’s what happens when her introversions gather the worldliness and confidence to let others in. There’s all the same tenderness, all the same familiarity, but it’s never sounded this good before.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Whether you read the title as a refusal to die or a foolish attempt to cling on, it doesn’t matter; both are just as relevant, and Martha have gone some way to capturing as much of it as possible.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like clear ancestral forefathers Faith, Hex Enduction Hour or The Downward Spiral, this is best enjoyed in small doses and every so often. It’s too good at what it does to be listened to daily. Handle with care and approach with caution.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Show Me The Body make music that isn't easy either; what's so important about them is their ability to drag your gaze in those uncomfortable directions.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    If this is what burgeoning motherhood looks like, then it is not a manufactured, diluted, and palatable version of oneself. Rather, it is an extension of an existing strong character, and in Kehlani we celebrate the power of a mother who isn’t afraid to say what she really thinks.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Seduction Of Kansas is an intelligent and essential record the establishes Priests as masters of their craft, and truly marks them out as one of the most capable punk bands around.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 95 Critic Score
    Titanic Rising is a new thing, her own stamp on the world. Like all the best musicians and songwriters before her, she’s plumbed the depths of her imagination and brought forth a masterpiece from the depths.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    She has created an album so unquestionably true to her quirks and personality traits that fans are offered a true insight into her process and psyche. This openness means they will be invested for the long run. Substance over streaming.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This debut record still sounds like a band caught between two stools, not sure if they’re still full-on punks anymore or softer, introspective shoegazers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If Uyai was Ibibio Sound Machine darting breathlessly from one sonic landscape to the next, Doko Mien is the band with a more focused approach and a sharpened sound, one that takes the best elements of their inimitable stylistic cocktail, and stamps it with a striking vibrancy and irresistible funk.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 65 Critic Score
    Side Effects is enjoyable, with inspired moments and a consistently danceable feel. It is frequently referential to the band’s previous work, which might make this more of a knockout record for the heads, rather than an entry point for new converts. Sometimes, though, it lacks the drive that reveals itself in the sparkliest songs.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    LP5
    LP5 is an album which simply affords itself space to breathe. Whether it be in Ring’s confidence in allowing a guest artist to fill the immediate musical landscape or the deference paid to the traditions of both electronic and acoustic music alike it all works together to create one of Sascha Ring’s most comprehensive releases to date.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Through this combination of the ethereal and the eccentric, Halo has curated a mix that twists neatly around her musical influences whilst lending an intimate sense of her own direction as a producer and DJ. It is a seamless collection rooted firmly in the contemporary which hints at a musician in complete artistic control.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whereas the less compelling stretches of its predecessor found Wagner seemingly bewitched by the new gizmos at his disposal, favouring texture and tone over tunecraft, This is more readily recognisable as a collection of Lambchop balladry, albeit one decked out in technological finery.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    On The Line may not be her strongest work, no matter how much it aims to be but it proves that Jenny Lewis doesn't need to try too hard to become one of the greats. She's already been one for a while.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 85 Critic Score
    Some tracks sound like Elvis ballads drowned out by faulty styluses and retro sound systems. Others are breathy song-cycles of gospel folk. For all the rich breeze and slinking Tarantino guitars in "Hope To Die", the track more resembles an ‘80s Mazzy Star-era shoegaze piece for the country purists to languish on. With Pony, Orville Peck has put himself in the boxing ring for his own ’68 Comeback Special.