Uncut's Scores

  • Music
For 8,656 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 The Blueprint
Lowest review score: 10 Let Me Introduce My Friends
Score distribution:
8656 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Another compellingly intimate listen. [May 2019, p.24]
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    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is another unhurried set of expertly played FM gold. [May 2019, p.27]
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    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While Forsyth is mindful to retain his more spontaneous impulses, this wonderfully intense set is dominated by "Techno Top", a pounding 20-minute groove that recalls both Talking Heads and Television. [May 2019, p.29]
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    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This audacious album succeeds not by altering Cage's distinctive identity but by exponentially amplifying it. [June 2019, p.26]
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Having helped define '90s alt.rock with Pavement, Kannberg here turns felicitous rock classicist. [May 2019, p.34]
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Andy Gill's guitar work is still distinctive and angular on tracks like "Toreador" and "Don't Ask Me," but the band seem intent on lending the old with the new. [May 2019, p.23]
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    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    V
    These 10 tightly wound, mystical mini-epics are underpinned by Jared Tankel's precision horns, and Brian Profilio, whose John Bonham drums bring the black country rock. [May 2019, p.24]
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    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Merciless perfection. [May 2019, p.30]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    White has found his sweet spot in the downhome elegance of Nashville's golden age, collaborating with venerable songwriters Whisperin' Bill Anderson and Booby Braddock, while Muscle Shoals bass legend David Hood anchors his studio band. [May 2019, p.37]
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    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Trent and Hearst have always been keen storytellers, digging deep into characters at loose ends, laying them out in the lyrics and then finding new depths and new sympathies in the performances. [May 2019, p.28]
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    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A welcome fusion of past glory with 21st century arena-rocking attitude. [May 2019, p.26]
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Even if the lyrical references to Greek mythology are a little nebulous, she's already created a world we believe in. [May 2019, p.29]
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    At first you're impressed by more robust moments such as "From Inside, Looking Out"--think Philip Glass on steroids. But further plays are to the benefit of the record's more restrained moments. [May 2019, p.37]
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It's a sequence of long, ambitious, noirish, trip-hoppy soundscapes narrated by Burnett on what sounds like a phone line from hell. [May 2019, p.24]
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    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Musically, it's not exactly mould-shattering, a blend of surf and chirpy indie rock. They're at their most effective when they deliberately fray the edges. [May 2019, p.29]
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    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sonically and creatively, these demos reflect their domestic environment, the realm of the historically valuable rather than the mind-blowing. [May 2019, p.38]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The sound remains satisfyingly Stax/Volt-centric yet also full of left-field touches. [May 2019, p.35]
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    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On this debut album they already sound fully formed, despite only having come together in 2016. [May 2019, p.37]
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    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a gorgeous and gutting return to Jurado's Rehearsals For Departure-era roots, wandering and bare, wielding only guitar and voice and recorded in one afternoon. [May 2019, p.30]
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These 10 art-pop and jazz-inclined abstractions are as elusive as they are instantly likeable, slipping away from definition even as you're listening via sweet melodic overplaying, elegant spaces and meandering/urgent grooves. [May 2019, p.32]
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    When You're Ready is a sharply confident debut, as Tuttle proves an expressive vocalist and an idiosyncratic songwriter. [May 2019, p.37]
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Idlewild throw together plenty of ideas--without much cohesion. [May 2019, p.29]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's transfixing and entirely dangerous. [May 2019, p.27]
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    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The Drums are more stupidly contagious than ever. [May 2019, p.27]
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Meditative, agitative and seductive throughout. [May 2019, p.32]
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    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Tightly structured, lavishly orchestrated, brilliantly realised. [May 2019, p.18]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Guy
    The covers aren't impersonations. [Apr 2019, p.28]
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    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    You're The Man is a bitty, madly varied collection. ... But as a series of discrete and individually brilliant EPs, it's a fascinating documents of the myriad directions that Gaye could have investigated at his creative peak. [May 2019, p.48]
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    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Collins' first album since 2013 sees the singer in pleasingly superb form. [Apr 2019, p.26]
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The group channel tasteful elements of the Grateful dead, the Allmans, Pink Floyd, Steppenwolf and CSNY in nine songs that swirl and melt into one one another, forming an album-oriented listen where dual guitars steer the ship, and nascent vocals take a back seat. [Apr 2019, p.29]
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